Category Archives: Books for teachers

The Creative Writing & Research Interviews: Jeri Kroll (part 2)

The Creative Writing & Research Interviews are a series of interviews with writer-researchers, in celebration of the publication of Researching Creative Writing by Jen Webb. Niyousha writes: Professor Jeri Kroll is currently Dean of Graduate Research and was formerly Program

The Creative Writing & Research Interviews: Jeri Kroll (part 2)

The Creative Writing & Research Interviews are a series of interviews with writer-researchers, in celebration of the publication of Researching Creative Writing by Jen Webb. Niyousha writes: Professor Jeri Kroll is currently Dean of Graduate Research and was formerly Program

Introducing the 53s

Niyousha writes: A few days ago, I posted about 53 interesting ways to communicate your research, hoping it would be of interest to writer-researchers who want to get creative with sharing their work. 53 interesting ways to communicate your research is

Introducing the 53s

Niyousha writes: A few days ago, I posted about 53 interesting ways to communicate your research, hoping it would be of interest to writer-researchers who want to get creative with sharing their work. 53 interesting ways to communicate your research is

Our Creative Writing Studies series: time for a high five

Niyousha writes: This month marks a landmark for our Creative Writing Studies series. Just four years ago around this time, we confirmed the publication of the very first title in the series, Rethinking Creative Writing by Stephanie Vanderslice. Since then,

Our Creative Writing Studies series: time for a high five

Niyousha writes: This month marks a landmark for our Creative Writing Studies series. Just four years ago around this time, we confirmed the publication of the very first title in the series, Rethinking Creative Writing by Stephanie Vanderslice. Since then,

Amal Chatterjee – Where do characters come from?

Will Martin writes: Amal Chatterjee is the editor of our Creative Writing: Writers on Writing and the author of Across the Lakes and the non-fiction Representations of India 1740-1840. His short fiction has been published in Time Out Amsterdam, Algebra

Amal Chatterjee – Where do characters come from?

Will Martin writes: Amal Chatterjee is the editor of our Creative Writing: Writers on Writing and the author of Across the Lakes and the non-fiction Representations of India 1740-1840. His short fiction has been published in Time Out Amsterdam, Algebra

The Future of Creative Writing?

Will Martin writes: Even before J.K. Rowling came onto the scene, plenty of heads were being scratched in the creative writing world, worrying about economic success – everyone, so we are told, wants to be the next ‘best seller’. But

The Future of Creative Writing?

Will Martin writes: Even before J.K. Rowling came onto the scene, plenty of heads were being scratched in the creative writing world, worrying about economic success – everyone, so we are told, wants to be the next ‘best seller’. But

Teaching Screenwriting

Will Martin writes: Craig Batty is a contributor to our Teaching Creative Writing, and editor of the forthcoming book Screenwriters and Screenwriting: Putting Practice into Context. He is currently working on a project focused on the theme of Teaching Screenwriting

Teaching Screenwriting

Will Martin writes: Craig Batty is a contributor to our Teaching Creative Writing, and editor of the forthcoming book Screenwriters and Screenwriting: Putting Practice into Context. He is currently working on a project focused on the theme of Teaching Screenwriting

Elaine Walker: ‘The Working Horse’ for The Royal Mail

Will Martin writes: Recently we caught up with Elaine Walker, the volume editor of our Teaching Creative Writing. She told us about William Cavendish, first Duke of Newcastle (1593-1676), and her work at his favourite residence, Bolsover Castle. Elaine says:

Elaine Walker: ‘The Working Horse’ for The Royal Mail

Will Martin writes: Recently we caught up with Elaine Walker, the volume editor of our Teaching Creative Writing. She told us about William Cavendish, first Duke of Newcastle (1593-1676), and her work at his favourite residence, Bolsover Castle. Elaine says: